The Salazar Survey

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cuzzinjack
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The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:07 pm

For those of you not familiar, “The Salazar Survey” is an account by Clay Worst about attempts in 1949 to find the meaning of maps and photos brought to Arizona by Cristobal Peralta in 1924. Only the happenings in 1924 are discussed here. This story is in Dr. Glover’s book, “Treasure Tales of the Superstitions”, and many thanks from this author to Mr. Worst for writing it, and Dr. Glover for including it in his book. A pdf of the article (but the sketch that Dr. Glover includes is not here) can be found at:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.anc ... 0Worst.pdf

In summary, Cristobal (72 yrs. old) was from Spain, but was born and raised Mexico. He came to Tucson in 1924, and at the Alianza Hispano-American, contracted the services of Perfecto Salazar, a Spanish-speaking American and former resident of Florence, as an interpreter to help him find records in Pinal and Maricopa counties of rich mines in the Superstitions his family used to operate there. After days of research? Cristobal drove Salazar from Phoenix to the Superstition mountains to visit the area where the mines were located. They “pulled over” “several miles” north of Apache Junction on Roosevelt Road (later to become the Apache Trail and Highway 88). Cristobal then shared a story that described members of the Peralta family undertaking a clandestine expedition in the winter of 1853-54 to mine for gold one more time and hide the mines (once again). They used surveying equipment to survey the mine location and the area, and they took small photographs of the mine site from varying distances (including one from high ground near the mine) with “El Sombrero” in the background of all of them. Cristobal then showed Salazar 3 glass photos and a detailed map of the Superstitions area (and the location of the mine) that included 4 Peaks, the Salt River, and the area extending to the Gila River.
Later, Salazar wrote down on a brown paper bag some of what he saw on the map, and later apologized that he did not remember more.
These are important excerpts from the Clay Worst account:

“The map, Peralta explained, was a survey of the mine site. The bearings and distances were referenced to the salient pinnacle, El Sombrero. In particular, a line ran northward from the pinnacle, accompanied by the numbers 4 and 62. There was also a transverse line running between three red hills and a two-room cave. A notation indicated that the pinnacle was 14 kilometers south of the Rio Salado. The meridian of reference for the survey was determined by an observation of Polaris, the north star, on the night of April 13th, 1854. It was important Peralta asserted, that the survey be done on the exact day of the year, so that the stars would occupy the same positions in the heavens as they did in the heavens as they did at the time of the original survey”.

“The mines were then carefully closed and concealed, lest they fall into the hands of the “Yanquis” who have taken this area without any benefit of right”.

“Salazar was also allowed to view, briefly, the three photographic plates. They were darkened by age, and it was difficult to ascertain much more than the outline of the skyline, with little foreground remaining. All three photographs were of the salient pinnacle, El Sombrero. The first photograph, Peralta stated, had been taken from the summit of the first high mountain in the direction of the mine from the camp on the Rio Salado. The spot was indicated on the map by a small square symbol, and lay near a meandering trail between the camp and the mine site. The second photograph was taken from the summit of the second high mountain in the direction of the mine. The pinnacle was not visible along the route between the sites from which the two photographs had been made. The third photograph was taken from high ground above the mine site.”

These inferences were drawn from the article:
• An accurate map in 1853, aligned with true north, could have been created by using a baseline that was derived from the sun or Polaris. But, it does not matter what date or time the north star is shot with a transit if an ephemeris or an alternate method Clay described is used to get a baseline for the survey.
• To find a specific location in no-man’s land, a scaled map with reference to north is all that is needed if landmarks are marked on the map and they can be seen. Apparently, that is what Salazar got to look at. But if you do not have a map, or do not want to continually drag it out, the bearings to 2 known landmarks from the unknown location are needed. Where imaginary lines created by those bearings intersect is the referenced location. It is apparent that Cristobal had both of these methods to choose from.
• It is apparent by reading the article that there was anti-American sentiment displayed by Salazar in 1924 considering comments about “Yanquis”, and the Mexican American war. After some research, it is unlikely the Alianza Hispano-American organization he was a member of in 1924 flew the American flag in their lodges. Salazar surely did not want an American to find the mine.
• Salazar was picked because of his knowledge of the Superstitions area, his skill as an interpreter, and someone befitting a visiting dignitary. He appears to have been very intelligent.
• The photos had to have some value, or Cristobal would not have brought them. Weaver’s Needle looks like a sombrero only in a very narrow band extending to the northwest from the Needle. Salazar said El Sombrero was in the background of all of the photos. While driving north on Highway 88 from Apache Junction, the full El Sombrero can be seen for only one brief instant, and is not able to be seen again until reaching the Needle Overlook (and it looks like a sombrero there). It is proposed that the Needle Overlook is where Perfecto and Cristobal pulled off and stopped the car.
• It is thought the numbers 4 and 62 are the numerical portions of quadrant bearings from the mine to known landmarks. Lewis and Clark used quadrant bearings, and they were common even 50 years ago.

So, if 4 and 62 are references to quadrant bearings, where would they radiate from, and where would they pointing to?
Although it is cheating, If the partial bearings are referencing the hill “Cerro Negra” written about by the author extensively on this site, the full quadrant bearings would be:
S 62 E
N 4 E

These would be the bearings shot from Cerro Negra and are referencing El Sombrero and the tiny hole through the mountain that can be seen along First Water road just as the sun comes up (photo below).

http://mollymarieprospect.com/salazar/holeinmount.JPG

It was presumed that these bearings were based on magnetic north, because if someone was giving these bearings for in-house use, the bearing would be used with a compass without the complications of calculating declination (the angle between true north and magnetic north). Using Google Earth, these bearings seemed to be very close to what they would be if they were based on magnetic north if radiating from Cerro Negra.

To validate the bearings from 1853 and take actual bearings, a Brunton “pocket transit” (photo below) was taken to Cerro Negra.

Image

The Brunton was used with the declination set at 0. El Sombrero was shot with the Brunton at:

S 65 E

The bearing taken with the Brunton to the “tiny hole” through the top of the mountain to the north of Cerro Negra and was:

N 2 E

These do not match the S 62 E and N 4 E exactly, but the change in declination has to be taken into account. It is mystery though, what the magnetic declination was in 1853. NOAA data gives declination for 1853 for Cerro Negra at 13 degrees E, and for 2017, 10 degrees E. The declination on Cerro Negra was calculated by the author at 13 degrees 2 weeks ago using compass readings and Google Earth Pro bearings that are based off of true north. There is a large magnetic anomaly beneath Tortilla Flats, and this may be why there is a large discrepancy (photo below). In conclusion, there is actually no way of knowing what the exact declination was in 1853 directly north of the Superstitions.

Image

However, the bearings from 1853 and 2017 were plotted in the photo below.

Image

Even though the declinations are not known, the arcs swung between the landmarks in 1853 and 2017 are almost EXACTLY the same (off by one degree). This is damning evidence that the bearings from 1853 and 2017 reference the same landmarks.

The odds of these bearings matching by coincidence on a location that was picked beforehand (Cerro Negra) are infinitesimally small. These conclusions are drawn:

• Mr. Salazar seems to have developed a case of selective amnesia regarding what he saw on the map Cristobal showed him. Amnesia created by money, loyalty, sworn oath, or dislike of Americans because of the Mexican American War?
• It is highly likely that Cristobal Peralta walked to Cerro Negra and the mines. It is an easy 15 minute hike up a flat wash to Cerro Negra from where the end of the Needle Overlook sidewalk is today.
• This has been known to the writer for some time, and the compass bearings reinforce the issue: The mines are not in the wilderness area. They are not in exceedingly rough terrain. And, the orebodies are not primarily quartz.

These are re-creations of the photos that were taken in 1853:

Photo #1 from high above. There is a another mountain to the south that is precisely on the S 65 E bearing to El Sombrero, but this is close.

Image

Photo #2. This is Cerro Negra on the S 65 E bearing. It has the classic shape of a VMS orebody formed beneath basalt. There are no annotations needed for this photo.

Image

Photo #3. This is El Sombrero at S 65 E taken from Cerro Negra.

Image

The task of finding the Peralta or “Sombrero” mines has been the greatest challenge this author has ever undertaken, and it has been extremely exciting and fulfilling at well. Even though the location of the mines is known, there is still a lot left to learn. Amen.

If there is anyone out there that has a business proposition for Cerro Negra, I’m all ears. Please contact me at dan@mollymarieprospect.com.

cuzzinjack

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:10 pm

An idea was hatched to check into the declination subject a little further, on a local scale………

All 20 of the mining claims that are staked on the Molly Marie caldera have their sidelines laid out at N20W, and the end lines are laid out at N70E. These bearings are based off of true north and NAD27 coordinates, the same that is used for the Goldfield quadrangle map. Below is the diagram at the bottom of the quadrangle map showing grid north(Google), true north, and magnetic north in 1981 (the grid and true north should be the same today).

Image

A spreadsheet was used to calculate the NAD27 coordinates of all posts before they were staked. Below is an example:

Image

Since the posts were set accurately with a gps, the same brunton compass was used to check the magnetic bearing of the post lines at several locations shooting down the lines of posts when they were visible. The declination varied from 10 to 13 degrees depending on the position and distance from basalt and deep red porphyry (they are magnetic). Note: This should have been thought of by the author a long time ago.
In conclusion, the NOAA declination data is accurate on a regional scale. If the declination moved 3 degrees west between 1853 and 2017 as NOAA indicates, the bearings that Salazar partially described would exactly match the bearings shot recently from the top of Cerro Negra (the bearing of tiny hole would be off by only one degree) if they were adjusted 3 degrees west (counterclockwise).

But there is more…….

My solution to the Stone maps was shown on this site some time ago, and the following photo with an inset of the map stone was posted:

Image

The triangle in the inset as shown is not perfectly rotated to match the corresponding triangle drawn on the google map photo (off by one degree), so the whole exercise was redone with a program called paint.net. The program counts the degrees of rotation, and the Stone Map was rotated exactly 13 degrees, from a position with the bottom edge of the stone setting flat, to match the google map.

So, the angle of rotation of the Stone map matches the NOAA declination in 1853 (and 1847). The Stone Map was created exactly according to magnetic north in 1847. But, this gets even better.

The tiny hole through the mountain used for the Salazar solution is the same tiny hole that was used for the Stone map solution. This was obviously quite a landmark for the Peralta’s. This hole can be seen driving down First Water Road at daybreak, and at no other time. The Stone Map screams that the hole must be found on the north side of Superstition Mountain (but a tiny hole) to find the mines. This is a picture of the hole from First Water Road early in the AM.

Image

The Spanish and Mexican maps that have surfaced are all describing the same place: Cerro Negra.

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:50 am

The author would have never had a clue about quadrant bearings, and could not have solved the Salazar mystery if it wasn’t from previous experience. The author learned to survey with a transit, the old school way, in 1979 and 1980 in both surface and underground environments. Below is a picture of a transit similar to what we used back then (the ones we used were older, from the 1920’s).

Image

Below is a close up of the compass on the transit; it is a quadrant compass.

Image

Our calculations were done with quadrant bearings for backsights and foresights. All calculations were done with a hand calculator that had trigonometric functions. Later, the author’s first mining job was surveying underground with a Wild T1A theodolite, but all the calculations were still done with a hand calculator and all bearings were quadrant bearings. Trigonometry was key. Today, many surveyors do not know how to do trigonometry well, or at all, because the instrument does everything for you (especially gps).

In a brief window in time, old and new has come together to reveal the 1853 surveyed location of the crown jewel of the Peralta mines: Cerro Negra.

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by Oroblanco » Wed Dec 20, 2017 1:22 am

Very interesting thank you for sharing this, I hope you will continue.
"We must find a way, or we will make one." --Hannibal Barca

cuzzinjack
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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Wed Dec 20, 2017 7:26 pm

Hi Oroblanco,

It is very good to see your posts. I've been working on a post for the "Chichilticale" thread off and on; have learned some new things about where there were many pits indicated by seismic survey. There is one more test that must be performed to confirm or deny that there was mining activity for 150 years, and possibly for several centuries, on the north side of the Superstitions: a gravity survey. Sometime this winter, hopefully.

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Sun Nov 17, 2019 7:44 pm

This thread “The Salazar Survey”, is regarding the most astounding evidence this author has found yet and gives the precise location of the bulk of the underground mines. Today, I went out to make the exact replication of photo No. 1 that Cristobal Peralta showed Perfecto Salazar. I had “winged it” above with a photo that I had taken high up on the cliff that is giant “heart” above Government Well. The photo below was taken at the proper S65E looking towards El Sombrero. This is looking over the top of highway 88. The photo shows the ridge that verifies this part of the story: “The first photograph, Peralta stated, had been taken from the summit of the first high mountain in the direction of the mine from the camp on the Rio Salado. The spot was indicated on the map by a small square symbol, and lay near a meandering trail between the camp and the mine site. The second photograph was taken from the summit of the second high mountain in the direction of the mine. The pinnacle was not visible along the route between the sites from which the two photographs had been made.”

Image

Okay, this is pretty cool, but the exact location of the mine was already known. This was done just to tie up a loose end.
What was shocking, at least to me anyway, that at EXACTLY 180 degrees from S65E, on the back-sight, which is N65W (see why they used quadrant coordinates!) , the below can be seen.

Image

This seems more like a movie than real life! The chance of this happening naturally seems impossible. I ran out of time today, but will get out there soon to see if this was carved or is a .........baby Stonehenge?

It can only be surmised that this was a guide to those that were cutting up from the Salt River: Just Look through the hole towards El Sombrero and the hill with the mine can be seen in the line of sight at what is now S65E. It also seems also that the Spanish and Mexicans would not have bothered with something like this; you know what that means?…………

The cleaned up version of this thread and the accompanying story “The Great Mine” can be found at:

www.mollymarieprospect.com

cuzzinjack

don
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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by don » Fri Nov 29, 2019 8:07 am

Hi
Ive tried clicking the link you provided but it leads me to a "this page can not be found" answer...could you provide another link please? it sounds interesting ,though i admit ,at this stage anyway, it doesnt give me much confidence in the conclusions.
kind regards
Don update your email address

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:13 pm

don,

Thank you for reporting the bad link. The website was made more secure, and did not realize some platforms do not automatically convert the “www” portion. Here is the new address and hope it works on this site (if not, just copy and paste in your browser):

https://mollymarieprospect.com/

I had not continued my story out of respect for Dr. Glover’s loss, and hope that he finds some comfort in knowing that there are many that feel like he does; there is a great overall sadness that far too many are passing that have worked so hard to solve the mystery.

I climbed up to the hole in the rock by myself late in the afternoon on Friday the 22nd, and that wasn’t the smartest thing I’ve ever done. The climb up there wasn’t simple, and there is only one convoluted route (not path) that must be followed. Here is a photo of the hole in the rock as I got close. Somebody had the huevos to put a stack of rocks on top of the spire on the right hand side; that is a crazy accomplishment.

Image

On the backside of the hole is a cliff far over 100 feet high (no exaggeration) about a dozen feet away, and a steep slope with many loose rocks between the hole and the cliff. The below photo was taken up close to the hole; I could not get back at all for a “framing shot” because of the cliff. I shouldn’t have taken the shot, it was much too risky.

Image

It was learned though while looking through the hole that Cerro Negra, Weavers Needle, and the hole do not line up perfectly; they are out of alignment by 5 or so degrees. The hole does look like it could have been manmade though, because there is much fresh, coarse, and loose rock on the backside that looks like it came from the hole.

This is a photo from the backside of the hole looking towards Saguaro Lake. I hiked down there many years ago and it is extremely rugged terrain.

Image

Although this experiment was not a success, it does not detract from the fact that the hill dubbed "Cerro Negra" renders the great mystery down to one place.

Please check out the “Great Mine” page in the below link that dovetails with this Salazar Survey thread. Quite a bit has been added recently.

https://mollymarieprospect.com/blog/the ... reat-mine/

Here is a good link also to the Salazar survey article by Clay Worst also, the other at the top of this thread does not work anymore.

https://mollymarieprospect.com/blog/wp- ... yworst.pdf

cuzzinjack

don
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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by don » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:18 am

Cuzzin jack....thanks for posting the new link-it works fine...only had a quick peek so far,but seems at first glance pretty interesting...quite a bit of reading there to digest and understand..im gonna give it a try..once again thanks
Don update your email address

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Re: The Salazar Survey

Post by cuzzinjack » Thu Dec 12, 2019 7:02 am

Hello don,

It has been a while since we've heard from you. What do think about the information on mollymarieprospect.com?

cuzzinjack

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